THE PAINT I used Army Painter paints to paint the baboons, from the  Warpaints Mega Paint Set, mixing up colours to suit my style  and preferences. The Mega Paint Set provides and adequate  range of colours for almost all needs, but you will often need  to mix colours to get the desired results. DRY-BRUSHING With so much well defined hair on show the best and quickest  method to paint most of a baboon is a technique called dry-  brushing. For heavily textured areas like hair, fur, and skin  (especially on big creatures) dry brushing is an essential skill. The Technique The term dry brushing is a bit misleading as neither the paint  nor the brush is actually “dry”, just dryer than if you were  painting normally. I used the Small Drybrush brush for all the  dry-brushing on the monkeys, which is ideal, its angled  bristles being especially useful. Paint When dry brushing the paint needs to have a thicker  consistency than you would normally use. Load some paint on the hairs of a flat brush (or an old normal brush that you no  longer use for detailed work) and check that you have the  right amount by gently brushing it across your finger print or a textured paper towel. If the paint picks out the raised detail  while leaving the indentations clear then you have the right  amount of paint on the brush. If the paint fills up the  indentations then you have too much, so wipe off the excess  paint on a tissue. Once you feel you have the right amount of paint, brush it  gently across the detail on the model. The paint should hit  
only the raised surfaces, picking out the detail with each  successive stroke and creating a quick and effective highlight.  Dry brushing works best when you draw your brush at 90° to  the surface you are highlighting, running across the creases or  hair rather than along them. It is important to note that at each  progressive stage the brush is loaded with less paint than  before. OLIVE BABOON The Olive Baboon is mostly the same colour all over, which is a  light grey/brown which has a greenish hue when seen in the  wild; the hair on the baboon’s face, however, ranges from dark  grey to brownish black. Painting the fur The shade coat is a mix of Matt Black, Uniform Grey and Oak  Brown. I dry-brushed this over the entire baboon, almost  obliterating the black undercoat completely. For the next layer I added Skeleton Bone to the above mix and  dry-brushed over the model again, but leaving some of the  shade coat showing. I then added some more Skeleton Bone and went over the  baboons again but this time very lightly just catching the tops of the fur. Painting the Face I then painted the face Matt Black and tidied up around the  model with the black. I then highlighted the face with Matt  Black mixed with Leather Brown. And then another highlight  with more Leather Brown mixed in, and then a final coat with  yet more Leather Brown added. The last touch was the eyes  which are Desert Yellow with Matt Black pupils.  
Below. For the next layer add Skeleton Bone to the above mix and dry-brushed over the model again.
Above. The shade coat is a mix of Matt Black, Uniform Grey and Oak Brown.
The shade coat is a mix of Matt Black, Uniform Grey and Oak Brown. © North Star Military Figures North Star Magazine home page Next Page Previous Page For the next layer add Skeleton Bone to the above mix and dry-brushed over the model again. more Africa articles download pdf Home Latest Content North Star Military Figures Crusader Artizan Great War Mantic Click here to order